Yoga for the Athlete

I don’t do meditation yoga.  I’ve tried (several times) and simply cannot do slow-motion things.  Just doesn’t roll with my life.

However, I do need to do yoga.  My muscles are inordinately tight (to the point where two deep tissue massages and physiotherapy twice per week isn’t enough), so something must be done!

Therefore, I’ve made it my goal to do a simple yoga routine, every day.

Here’s the plan.

I start the sequence with a downward facing dog.  Delightful for my horribly tight hamstrings, calves and Achilles, and also really opens the back and shoulders.  I often stay here for 5-10 deep breaths.

I then bring my right leg between my hands in downward dog, and move into a lunge.  I have to actually use my hand to move my right leg up to where it needs to be because I’m that inflexible.  In this lunge pose, I will sit deep for one breath, stand for one breath, deep for one breath, etc, for up to 10 breaths.

Next, I bring my left elbow to my right knee in the lunge position, and open my chest to the right side.  I hold here for five breaths.

I then move into warrior 2, opening my body and trying to sit as deep as possible.  Sometimes, I will do what I do in the lunge, and move from sitting deep to half-standing for ten breaths.  If I’m feeling particularly strong, I’ll hold deep for ten breaths.

Finally, I move into the stork.  This is (BY FAR) the hardest position on my right side.  My tendon catches along my joint and won’t release, so I barely get into this position.  Because my tendon was cut on my left side, I can do this position more easily… but whew, the right is a challenge.

Return to downward facing dog, and repeat on the left side!

It doesn’t take terribly long, and it’s really quite nice.  It doesn’t have to be silent, but certainly can be if you’d like.  I usually rock out to my hip-hop playlist Winking smile

Happy stretching!

Advertisements

Returning to England

There are SO many reasons that I’m excited to return to England (having spent a year abroad there during undergrad), but here are some highlights of what I can’t wait to return to! –

1. English sport culture!  Really, who knows the rules of cricket?  Also, I’m a die-hard soccer (sorry, footbol) fan, so I can’t wait to be in a country that lives & breathes it!  Oh, and rugby – must learn to love that, too!  Here I am at a rugby game last year in Bath, England. 

135

2. Rowing culture.  Do I even have to mention the fact that rowing is a way of life there, too? Match made in heaven.

Eights M1 (15) blades

3. The History.  It’s mind-blowing to be at a university whose buildings are so much older than the founding of your native country.  Seriously, I would walk past buildings form the 1300 and 1400s in Oxford, every single day.  Likewise in Cambridge.  It’s wonderful to be surrounded by so much (beautiful) history.

75681_1458230941932_1418130018_31018491_4596696_n

Big

4. Pub Life!   I love the casual drinking with friends culture (rather than the ‘party party party’ culture perpetuated in the States).  Pubs also have delicious food, my favorite being meat pies.  Delicious.  Oh, and they’re all so cute and usually old-as-all-else.  They’re perfect for people watching, too.

120

5. Fancy balls!  Oxford and Cambridge boast some incredible balls throughout the year, culminating in astounding spring balls.  They all have great themes, abounding food and drink, and awesome company.  And who really doesn’t love an excuse to dress up?

Frame3

6. Punting.  The coolest way to pass time in the nicer months of the year, and a great place for a picnic.  You already know my love of boats.

042

7. The accents.  Sure, I’ve been dating a Brit for quite awhile, but the accent absolutely never gets old.  How can it?  I also the range of accents, from South to North, England.  They vary so much!  I was once very good at distinguishing regional accents, so I hope that I get that back!  I always love some of their phrases (‘brilliant,’ ‘bugger,’ ‘banter,’ anyone?).

Nearly the 5 week count-down until I move to England!